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Working full time as employee and doing translations as freelancer / Taxes?

Question

I recently moved from Germany for a full time job as employee in Brussels. When I was living in Germany 2-3 times a years a worked too as a translator or interpreter during weekends, writing bills for it. In Germany I was used to declare everything in my tax declaration and expect that the state will deduct some 40% of my income as freelancer but that I could deduce many costs I had for doing this work. Now I live here but I still have the chance next year to do this freelance jobs in Germany. How does this work? I declare them here as extra income? Or in Germanz separately? How much can In expect that I will have to pay on taxes for every 1 EUR earned as freelancer?

wezembeekwanderer

Normally you pay tax here. The income will be added to your regular income so will be taxed at your top rate.
Talk to an accountant as the rules are complicated and depend on how much work you do. Best to inform your employer too.

Nov 26, 2019 05:10
J

If it's regular work, set yourself up as an Independant Complimentaire. If it's occasional work, go through an agency that looks after tax and NI for you.

You'll get better advice at www.1819.be

Nov 26, 2019 09:17
anon

Unfortunately the system here is deliberately and intentionally set up to make it difficult for individuals like you that want to do occasional paid work.

That's why the black economy is such a massive problem here in Belgium. It's easier just to take the money and not declare it.

In terms of what taxes you'll pay, if you do decide to declare it, that income is added to your current salary and taxed at whatever your highest marginal tax rate is. You will also have to deduct ONSS payments.

As J notes above, if this is just an occasional job, use an agency that will handle everything.

To be honest, you'd be better of to just send a bill, take the money and "forget" to declare it. You're about as likely to get a tax audit as you are to win the lottery.

Nov 26, 2019 15:06