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What’s on this week: 6-12 November

17:36 05/11/2020
Our top picks of corona-safe or digital events in Belgium

What do Belgium and the Czech Republic have in common? They both sell a lot of beer. Beer is famously cheaper than water in the Czech Republic, and it is also the country with the highest beer consumption per capita in the world. Find out what all the fuss is about during Beer Superpowers, an online tasting session of five Czech beers and five Belgian beers. It takes place in English in both countries simultaneously, with Czech residents tasting the Belgian beers, and Belgians tasting the Czech beers. The event is led by Filip Nerad, EU affairs analyst at Czech Radio and author of The Beer Kingdom of Belgium, and Luc De Raedemaeker (pictured), tasting director at Brussels Beer Challenge. The Czech beers can be picked up in Leuven or ordered for delivery in Brussels or Leuven. Feel free to buy the Belgian beers, too, if you want to include them in your tasting. 10 November 19.30

Brussels residents enthusiastic to see a car-free Bois de la Cambre cycle over for a more-or-less collective ride every Tuesday at lunchtime. Find them circling around the north loop, possibly wearing something green or white so you can spot them. Tuesdays 12.00-14.00, Avenue de Flore/Avenue de Diane

Movie soundtracks clue you in on what’s coming from the get-go: Ominous distorted electronics or light piano against the very same city skyline offer very different messages. And now you can wander around different parts of Brussels with your own personal soundtrack as you pop in your earbuds and tune in to Beursschouwburg’s On the Go series. Artists created the soundscapes to fit with mapped-out walks. A mix of spoken word and music offer a wholly new way to experience your – or another – neighbourhood. There are 10 in total, making for plenty of lockdown-friendly entertainment.

Brussels Philharmonic

When we think of classical music, composers of yesteryear, like Beethoven and Bach, often come to mind first. Composers of the second half of the 20th century, however, coined the term ‘contemporary music’ to describe a modern, eclectic approach to the genre. Discover pieces that might be considered classics 400 years from now at the Ars Musica festival, a celebration of contemporary music. This year’s festival is online and completely free, livestreamed from venues like Théâtre Poème and Botanique. Among the 20+ performances is the opening concert, livestreamed from Flagey and featuring 1970s work by Morton Feldman, Anna Thorvaldsdottir and Claire-Mélanie Sinnhuber. 6-27 November

Citizen movement Stand Up for Europe is launching Stand-Up Talk, a monthly series of conversations in English with European stakeholders on EU matters. First up is Hungarian MEP Katalini Cseh, vice-president of Renew Europe. An expert in health economics, she will talk about the new reality of a post-pandemic Europe. 6 November 17.00

Brussels’ Pop-Up Yoga Concepts generally offers classes in unique spots like rooftops, art galleries and co-working spaces, but now it’s going online. Beginners and intermediate practitioners are welcome to join the free, livestreamed classes. Donations accepted. Sundays 18.00, Wednesdays 18.30

Brussels-based electronic musician Otto Lindholm

If you can’t come to the Schiev Festival, the Schiev Festival will come to you. Named after the Brussels dialect word for crooked or distorted, the festival features avant-garde pop music in all of its many varieties. The live sessions are all free online. 9-15 November

The Kazerne Dossin Holocaust museum and memorial in Mechelen has developed a virtual version of Auschwitz.camp, the exhibition that ran at the museum until September. It looks at the history of the infamous camp, where policies of imperialism, anti-Semitism, economics and extermination converged, transforming a simple rural town into what would go down in history as a byword for horror. In English, French and Dutch.

Photos, from top: ©Bart Van der Perre, ©Bram Goots, ©Max Meyer

Written by Lisa Bradshaw