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After two-year absence, the Iris Festival returns to Brussels in May

Iris Festival Visitbrussels
16:12 11/04/2022

After a two-year hiatus due to the pandemic, the Iris Festival is making its return to Brussels on 7 and 8 May, marking the 33rd anniversary of the Brussels-Capital Region.

With the Electro Night, the 100th anniversary of garden neighbourhoods, the Iris Food Corner and a variety of street theatre and art, the programme is packed with ways for residents and visitors to rediscover the Belgian capital. 

Saturday will mark the festival’s opening with the first free open-air event since coronavirus measures were lifted. There will also be activities in conjunction with Europe Day, which sees the European institutions open their doors for guided tours, public talks and original games. 

The big draw on Sunday will be the Park Festival in the Royal Park, “where visitors will be able to discover the rich and particularly varied offerings in Brussels,” according to a press release.

New this year is the ‘100 years of garden neighbourhoods’ that celebrates Brussels’ flora and foliage with a festival and free guided tours of lush municipalities, from Berchem-Sainte-Agathe to Woluwe-Saint-Lambert, Boitsfort and Laeken.

Another new addition that’s guaranteed to attract crowds is a food truck festival with 40 different mobile vans offering a diverse range of gourmet and artisan food and drink. 

Finally, Brussels transport network Stib will organise a tram parade on the Rue Royale that presents an overview of the capital’s transport history, from horse-drawn carriages, vintage trams and Stib’s latest model. The public will also be invited to step on board.

The Iris Festival is “the occasion for Belgians to gather and rediscover the conviviality of the capital,” say organisers.

Photo: Iris Festival 2019 (c) Visit.brussels/Eric Danhier

 

 

Written by Helen Lyons